Friday, April 15, 2011

Bravo Catherine Zeta-Jones!




If you haven’t already heard in the news or blog world this week, a rep for Catherine Zeta-Jones confirmed that the actress sought treatment in a mental facility to treat her Bipolar II Disorder. We don’t really know the details of her condition and I acknowledge that she may have been pushed to share this personal part of her life after paparazzi revealed that she checked herself into the hospital. But I still think that she deserves a standing ovation for showing the world that a classy, beautiful woman can be living a successful life managing her disorder. I think so many people get their view of what this disorder is all about after they see a person hitting rock bottom and acting outrageous. It was a brave step to take on her behalf, but I think it will do wonders in helping the world understand that this is just an illness in the body, like cancer or diabetes and that you can live a responsible, successful life with this disorder.

Bravo Catherine Zeta-Jones!


Watch the clip above to see how The Today Show used this announcement as an opportunity to teach people about Bipolar Disorder and address the negative stigma around it. It’s good stuff!


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Video Source:
http://today.msnbc.msn.com/id/42589427

6 comments:

  1. I don't know why but I teared up watching the news clip. It is such a relief to see such a stunning woman admitting she is Bipolar. Thank you for posting this.

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  2. You’re Welcome! I had the same reaction.

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  3. Kuddos to you and The Today Show!

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  4. When I heard this on the news, it was pretty cool to see. Like, it's cool how many people are coming out about it more and more and saying "Hey, I'm dealing with this. I'm a real person.", you know?

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  5. You’re right Hayden, it’s so cool to see so many people coming forward. It makes me wonder if the statistics are all wrong, they keep saying that only 1% have bipolar disorder, but that doesn't take into account all those who feel into drug abuse before they realized they had a disorder or all those misdiagnosed, or labeled NOS, or too afraid of the stigma to seek treatment. I bet the number is much higher.

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