Friday, June 13, 2014

10th Annual Mood Disorders Education day


Well it’s that time again, time for Stanford’s Annual Mood Disorders Education day. I’ve had the privilege of attending this event many times and each time it’s a wonderful experience where I meet new people and learn new things about mood disorders in adults and children. If you’ve never been and live in the area, go now to the website to register and save yourself a spot. This is a FREE event, plus they serve you complimentary refreshments (bonus!).

Here are the details:

When:
Saturday June 28, 2014
from 8:30 am–2:30 pm

Where:
William R. Hewitt Teaching Center
370 Serra Mall
Stanford University
Stanford CA, 94305

Register: https://mded.eventbrite.com

Contact: Kathryn Goffin at kgoffin@stanford.edu

This event is free. However, they do ask that you register. Information about the event, including directions and a map, are on the registration website.

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Here is a link to my review of last years event:

Unfortunately I’m disappointed to share that I won't be able to attend due to a prior commitment. But I still hope to post videos of the event once they become available online. If you yourself attend and want to do a guest post to share all that you learned, I would love that! Email me!

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The Bipolar Disorders Clinic is part of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. We offer on-going clinical treatment, manage clinical trials and neuroimaging studies, lecture and teach seminar courses at Stanford University and train residents in the School of Medicine.

Clinic Chief Terence A. Ketter, M.D. is internationally known for his groundbreaking research on the neurobiology of mood disorders. More »

The Bipolar Disorders Clinic is also part of the Stanford Mood Disorders Clinic. Please see the Mood Disorders Clinic Brochure to learn about the clinic's vision and exceptional doctors and researchers, who specialize in the understanding and treatment mood disorders.


Friday, June 6, 2014

Boogie Men and Young Imaginations

Last year I wrote a post about my oldest son overcoming his fear of Slender Man. Today I was surprised to see several urgent emails in my mailbox from NBC Nightly News and the Today Show wanting to see if I would be willing to share my son’s experience about Slender Man on camera.

This comes after the arrest of two 12-year-old girls who allegedly stabbed their friend 19 times. Acccording to NBC news, the girls blamed their violent act on Slender Man.

I quickly declined the interviews, but asked my son about his feelings of Slender Man today.

First I should note, never did my son think Slender Man was real, instead, it was something that creeped him out until he bravely faced his fears in the woods one evening. For us, Slender Man was an opportunity for our son to face his fears head on and experience the peace that followed.

Today my son no longer fears Slender Man. He was actually surprised when he heard the news story saying,“Why would those girls want to kill someone for Slender Man? Slender Man is a character in a game that you run from—that doesn’t make sense!”

Gone is Slender Man from my boys’ imaginations, but we’ve faced other online mythical creatures since then. Such as “Jeff the Killer” a mythical creature who tells you to “go to sleep”, then once you do, the creature kills you. For about a month, this made sleeping a challenge for my youngest who then feared falling to sleep.

I’m not going to blame the internet for these experiences, though they’re scary and unfortunate, they’re nothing new to our society. When I was a kid, I was terrified of dolls that could kill you or poltergeists that came out of tv sets. As far as I’m concerned, there will always be boogie men and young imaginations. 

If you ask me, Slender Man did not cause this crime. I think it’s a waste of time to put all of our focus on Slender Man and shame the creators of this mythical creature.

Instead, we need to dig deeper and put our energy where it will make a difference. 

Let’s stop looking at the cartoon and look at the girls before us.



In case you missed my original post, here it is:

'Slender Man' Cited in Stabbing Is a Ghoul for the Internet Age